Preposterous adjectives

Which part of language carries the most judgement? Adjectives, according to Simon Heffer, editor of the Daily Telegraph. As a Clean Language enthusiast I’ve thought a lot about how to be as non-judgemental as possible in questioning, and as a news reporter and editor I was passionate about sticking to the facts as far as…

Continue Reading →

Elephants at IKEA

We went to IKEA yesterday. As well as a carful of storage solutions, the trip provided a great opportunity to examine how the Swedish furniture giant encourages people to spend. I’m old enough to remember when Ikea first opened up in Britain, and completely changed the context in which we did our furniture shopping by using…

Continue Reading →

Frame control – the power of context

Great influencers have long recognised the power of setting the context of any conversation. For example, pick-up artists discuss “frame control” and assert that “In an interaction between two people, whoever has the stronger frame/reality wins”. Of course, I don’t accept their win-lose frame! Influential interactions can be, and in my opinion should be, win-win, especially…

Continue Reading →

Downhill all the way

I was lucky enough to have a fabulously smooth journey just before Christmas. It was “downhill all the way” from North Yorkshire to London, in a van filled with my husband’s and stepson’s possessions as they finally moved their stuff in with me, six months after our wedding. If you’re based in the UK you’ll…

Continue Reading →

What is it about metaphor?

In The Master and His Emissary, Iain McGilchrist explores the relationship between the right and left hemispheres of the brain. And it’s no accident that he’s used a powerful metaphor as the title of his book. I’m still less than halfway through his book (after hearing McGilchrist speak at the NLP Conference last month) but…

Continue Reading →

Page 2 of 4