Is passive income damaging your health?

Could the myth of “passive income” be damaging your health – or at least your psychological well-being – as Daniel Priestley, author of Become a Key Person of Influence,  proposed in a talk recently? He argued that the notion of “passive income” was founded on the idea of making money by doing something one didn’t…

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Preposterous adjectives

Which part of language carries the most judgement? Adjectives, according to Simon Heffer, editor of the Daily Telegraph. As a Clean Language enthusiast I’ve thought a lot about how to be as non-judgemental as possible in questioning, and as a news reporter and editor I was passionate about sticking to the facts as far as…

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Elephants at IKEA

We went to IKEA yesterday. As well as a carful of storage solutions, the trip provided a great opportunity to examine how the Swedish furniture giant encourages people to spend. I’m old enough to remember when Ikea first opened up in Britain, and completely changed the context in which we did our furniture shopping by using…

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What is it about metaphor?

In The Master and His Emissary, Iain McGilchrist explores the relationship between the right and left hemispheres of the brain. And it’s no accident that he’s used a powerful metaphor as the title of his book. I’m still less than halfway through his book (after hearing McGilchrist speak at the NLP Conference last month) but…

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Why it pays to use their words

The new coalition government in the UK uses a different language to its predecessor. Of course, it’s still English – and it’s still packed with jargon! But according to a leaked memo, there have been subtle changes. “Targets” have been replaced by “results”; “stakeholders” by “people”; “narrowing the gap” by “closing the gap”; “state” by…

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